We have all heard and believed in these things about animal behavior. In fact, many of these myths about animals have been around for so long that some people get angry when they discover them. However, these frequently recurring “facts” are not scientific data, but only anecdotal evidence to support them. These are some myths about animals (16 to be exact) that many still believe, but according to science, we are simply not true.

 

1. If people handle baby birds, their parents will reject them.




We have all heard and believed in these things about animal behavior. In fact, many of these myths about animals have been around for so long that some people get angry when they discover them. However, these frequently recurring “facts” are not scientific data, but only anecdotal evidence to support them. These are some myths about animals that many still believe, but according to science, we are simply not true.

 

2. Birds die if they consume wedding rice.

Who knows where this error comes from, but it’s certainly not true. Wedding rice is generally dehydrated rice, as opposed to wild grains. Despite the fact that it is a tradition dating back to ancient Egypt, today’s wedding planners foam instead of rice for fear of killing poor little church birds if it spreads to their stomachs. But the truth is that rice doesn’t swell enough to hurt birds a little. A 2002 study at the University of Kentucky showed that common bird species spread in the stomach more than in rice. Therefore, weddings are not a complete meal for church birds.

 

3. Bats are blind creatures.

All bats have eyes because they can be seen to some extent. In fact, bats use both eyesight and “sonar” eyesight, so they can be seen very well. Most bats use echolocation (a kind of sonar) and can be “seen” in more detail than humans. How else do you think these little kids can find the smallest flying mosquitoes in the darkest places?

 

4. Pitbulls are a breed that’s considered to be harmful and dangerous.

Any dog ​​can attack humans, and the pitbull is no exception, but because of its DNA the breed itself is no longer violent. This dog is generally kept for combat and is easy to make fun of, but many breeds are trained to kill things and are not off-limits to parks and buildings. German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Dobermans, and butterflies are raised from a series of “bullies”. Pitbulls are aggressive only when trained.

 

5. You get warts from toads.

This myth probably began when the mother was afraid that her children would carry the disease and wanted a way for them to stop collecting animals outside. Rugged frogs and other frogs do not give warts. These lumps, unlike most frogs that require moisture, help frogs live in dry climates. This property also helps frogs blend into their environment with the textures that are possible through the warty ridges. These blows may be unique physical characteristics, but they cannot be transmitted to humans.

 

6. The most poisonous spiders are Daddy Longlegs.

You probably don’t know much about this spider. For one thing, the spider you think is a long-legged dad maybe another. There are daddy’s long-legged spiders, but in England, the creature of this name is not a spider at all. The long-legged cellar spider is an example of a dad’s long legs and is probably a landmark of this myth. Importantly, there are no records of fox spiders biting humans and causing any reaction. If they are really toxic, we will only know if they have been milked and poisoned humans. It has not been done. And there is no toxicological study of any kind showing the effects of toxins on mammals.

 

7. Ostriches Bury Their Heads In Sand.

This myth, like many other species of birds, probably derives from the fact that ostriches eat pebbles and sand to help digest food. They also spin eggs in their beaks. This is another thing that brings your head closer to the ground. As we once believed, if an ostrich stabs its head into the sand, it will probably suffocate and die.

 

8. While migrating, Lemmings commit mass suicide.

While filming the 1958 Disney Desert “Documentary” (which won an Oscar for Best Documentary) in 1958, filmmakers filmed mutations of rodents after shooting fake exit scenes. A Canadian documentary called Cruel Camera, released years later, showed rodents deployed in the White Desert moving from Hudson Bay to Calgary, where they did not jump off a cliff, but actually jumped out of the cliff with a turntable were drawn. . Rodents don’t rush off cliffs. They sometimes wander and fall off cliffs or rivers during these migrations – like many other migratory species, accidentally.

 

9. If a dog has a wet nose, it means it’s healthy.

A cold or wet nose on the dog indicates its level of activity and does not indicate any health problems. As with humans, nasal sweat helps dogs regulate their internal body temperature. Dogs also have a layer of mucus that forms on their nose to help them smell better, and when a dog licks their nose they take a sample of the odor they smell.

 

10. Possums hang with their tails on trees.

Opossum plants have a semi-preventive tail, right? Small children can be hung upside down for a short time, but why should they? This is not necessary. Why not put your feet on a pole and always hang them upside down? Or should I sleep like this? of course not. Maybe that’s because possums usually live in and around trees.

 

11. During winter, Bears go into hibernation mode.

If you try to wake the bear in hibernation, you will be miserable. First, bears are not “real” hibernators. While some slow down in winter – even to a point where they sleep late, which is known as hibernation – they don’t sleep all season. Most importantly, they can be awakened during this hibernation phase. So, if you find a bear in a dream, it is better to leave it alone.

 

12. Goldfish have a three-second memory.

Be careful goldfish owners – your suspicious friend can be vengeful. Well maybe not. But they definitely remember things for more than three seconds. Goldfish can remember things for five months or more. Scientists have found that goldfish can remember the times of the day they normally feed and expect to feed them for months.

 

13. Red is the color that bulls hate.

Sorry for the unusual wrestlers – that’s not true at all. The legend began after bullfighters began using molita – little redheads – in bullfighting in the 18th century. This led to the belief that the color of the clover guided the cow, not the clover itself. The bull appears to be almost responsive to red, blue, and whiteheads. The size of the clover – not the color – makes the Taurus react.

 

14. The lice on the head only prefer long or dirty hair.

Head lice are an opportunity for attackers. In fact, there are many myths about head lice, but none are greater than the length and quality of the hair they live in. The fact is that these pests will choose any human head that they can successfully contact. This has nothing to do with personal hygiene or hygiene and they prefer long locks to short locks. They can live on any human scalp and are spread through contact with head lice, usually through a common brush or comb.

 

15. Camels store water in their back humps.

Camels roaming the desert must be very thirsty. The more water they store in the hump – right? the mistake. Surprisingly, a camel can go seven days without water, but that’s not because there is an extra barn behind it. Hedgehogs are nothing more than fatty tissue that can be burned if the camel has not eaten for a long time. So what is very effective in storing water for camels? Kidneys; He takes out the camels and uses a lot of water in their body and their urine comes out in a thick syrup.

 

16. The Alpha is the leader of a wolf pack.

This myth goes on, and people have used the terms “alpha” and “beta” to describe personality types. But in reality, dogs don’t use the alpha and beta social hierarchies to determine who is responsible. The domains are very similar to human families, with teams of adults – whether mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, etc. – raising younger children. The bigger the wolf, the stronger it is in the herd. The order of birth determines how independent a puppy is between siblings – that is, as long as he or she has a family.