We are able to adapt to changes at work. It is the way it is, with brilliant ideas coming into workers’ minds and new procedures taking place. Sometimes these transitions include a whole new regime and owners who have so much trust in their abilities, they don’t see beyond their own noses.

A few days ago, NotLagrange created a post on r/MaliciousCompliance about that. They work as a logistical consultant and had a long-term contract with a friend. He was forced to sell the business to an ignorant entrepreneur, who they referred to as Bob, because of the Pandemic.

“He did not understand what exactly my job was and thought it was unnecessary,” NotLagrange wrote. The author was told to take a pay cut or be fired. Two patents that were crucial for the company’s survival have been filed by an employee. The whole story should be read.




 

A new boss gave NotLagrange an ultimatum to either take a pay cut or be fired.

 

They created a post about how they ended up bankrupting the business.

 

In a few days, the thread collected more than 11.6k votes and hundreds of comments praising the author for standing by their principles. NotLagrange admitted that they had read posts from r/MaliciousCompliance for a long time. “So when I finally had a story to share, I was thrilled to be able to contribute to the forum,” they told. When they decided to write out their thoughts, they “did not have any clue how many people would react positively to [the post].”

They didn’t think it would get as much attention as it has. “I’m still shocked by the support and response I got,” they said. The author rarely gets to talk about it outside professional settings.

NotLagrange thinks that many people could relate to the story. When the author did it, many thought the boss got what he deserved.

The user added an update. They reached out to some of the coworkers who stayed on to learn about Bob’s plan. The author’s friend of the patent issue was informed by the entrepreneur that he has experience dealing with proprietary complications before. A patent lawyer was hired by the new boss to find out what changes would need to be made to the process.

“The warehouse manager was told to increase production and create a surplus before my contract expired,” NotLagrange wrote. This way “the line could be modified and the orders … could be filled while he had talks with the clients.” Only a few people were able to change the machines. “Between the lack of hands, unexpected complications in implementing the modifications, and having only two-thirds of the floor machines actually working, the surplus had run out and the orders could no longer be filled.”

Bob underestimated his abilities and lost clients and employees. The situation is unlikely to be resolved soon but the author is already talking to his lawyer about an idea he has of giving the company back to his friend as a birthday present.

If you are dealing with unfair bosses, the only piece of advice NotLagrange would like to give you is to know your worth. “People will always undervalue you if you allow them to. Stand up for yourself,” they advised.

 

People reacted after reading the story.