A Twitter Dad shared a tweet, “see this..this why I wanted boys” in which his face is all painted and is directed towards his daughter’s actions.

Scroll down below and have some laughs to make your day better.




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“One man, named ‘Domooooo’ on Twitter, decided to post a picture of himself seemingly covered in red face paint or makeup, the caption stating “see this…this is why I wanted boys”, implying that his daughter or multiple of them had created the beautiful drawings on their dad’s face. The tweet has gained a lot of traction, with at least 118K likes and dozens of dads sharing their own experiences, whether that be hairdos, pedicures, or more makeup. In my opinion, they all look fabulous!”

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“According to Amy, toxic masculinity glorifies unhealthy habits, with beliefs “stating that ‘self-care is for women’ and men should treat their bodies like machines by skimping on sleep, working out even when they’re injured, and pushing themselves to their physical limits.” It also discourages men from seeing doctors and asking for help, and the inherent emotionlessness of masculinity may lead to mental health issues. But, thankfully, society is starting to walk towards a more healthy future, regardless of how slow the steps seem to be, and one of those ways is through makeup.”

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Megan O’Grady wrote, “that makeup has now become a symbol for a dissolving gender binary when, for much of the 20th century, it was just one more thing that divided the sexes.” It’s never been a woman-only thing to embellish oneself, quite the contrary, however, we can thank Beau Brummel for the starkness and lack of color that defines the masculine look of today.

“Megan describes makeup as an inexpensive tool for self expression, allowing all those who use it to delve into the conundrum of self expression, whether to fit in or to stand out, “to feel, at long last, liberated from shrunken notions of gender and grossly restrictive social confines.” At the end of the day – it is just painted. What we attribute to it is deeply embedded in our perception of its meaning, whether a mode of expression or a form of definition.”

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